Dinner and Dance Nights

Our monthly Dinner and Dance Parties include an excellent buffet dinner accompanied by live Wurlitzer Organ music. Following dinner we also have dance music performed by the Egan Brothers Trio.

Click Here for more details and to make a reservation.

 

Silent Movie Screenings

We screen both old and new silent movies during our Silent Movie Series. These are accompanied by the Mighty Wurlitzer Organ, making for an exceptional experience. During the movie, enjoy popcorn, treats and soft drinks that are available at our snack bar. Tickets purchased at the door.

Click Here for more details.

 

See below for a full listing of our upcoming public events:

Filter: Categories
  • Dinner and Dance
  • Silent Movies

Agenda

  1. Mar
    13
    Thu

    1. Cecil B. DeMille’s “The Squaw Man” – Silent Movie
      7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

      Cecil B. DeMille’s “The Squaw Man”

      As Hollywood goes through the annual ritual and frenzy of the Oscars, celebrating all it is and aspires to be through the prism of this year’s films, it’s worth noting that 100 years ago the first feature-length film actual made in Hollywood reached theaters.
      Cecil B. DeMille’s The Squaw Man (1914), a 78-minute film produced by Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Company, eclipsed all the short films produced up to that time in Hollywood.
      Lasky, who met DeMille while producing two Broadway musicals in 1911, persuaded him to join with him in setting up a production company with the express purpose of making feature-length films.
      They bought the rights for a Broadway play, The Squaw Man, which had enjoyed a successful run on stage since 1905 for $4,000 and headed for Arizona to make their picture. Not impressed with the Arizona scenery they continued on to Hollywood, California.
      DeMille rented a barn on Vine Street, just north of Sunset Boulevard. He began filming The Squaw Man on December 29, 1913. For outdoor filming he was his own location scout and found beautiful settings: San Pedro was the ideal location for the harbor scenes; the San Fernando Valley just the spot for the western saloon; Keen Camp in Idllwild, California perfect for cattle grazing scenes in the open range; and, Mount Palomar for snow scenes.
      The Squaw Man, the first of many Westerns to come, was released on February 15, 1914 to the delight of audiences who flocked to it. Not only was it the first feature length film produced in and around Hollywood but it was the film that would jump-start the amazing directing career of the great Cecil B. DeMille.
      Interesting note that DeMille would remake The Squaw Man twice more! Four years later as a silent and then again in 1931 as an early sound film.

      BLAINE GALE, who was invited to play the score on a keyboard for the recent screening of The Squaw Man on the Brigham Young University campus will provide a score on the Wurlitzer Theatre Pipe Organ for our screening on Thursday & Friday, MARCH 13 & 14th at 7:30 pm

       

      Squaw Man

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

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  2. Mar
    14
    Fri

    1. Cecil B. DeMille’s “The Squaw Man” – Silent Movie
      7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

      Cecil B. DeMille’s “The Squaw Man”

      As Hollywood goes through the annual ritual and frenzy of the Oscars, celebrating all it is and aspires to be through the prism of this year’s films, it’s worth noting that 100 years ago the first feature-length film actual made in Hollywood reached theaters.
      Cecil B. DeMille’s The Squaw Man (1914), a 78-minute film produced by Jesse L. Lasky Feature Play Company, eclipsed all the short films produced up to that time in Hollywood.
      Lasky, who met DeMille while producing two Broadway musicals in 1911, persuaded him to join with him in setting up a production company with the express purpose of making feature-length films.
      They bought the rights for a Broadway play, The Squaw Man, which had enjoyed a successful run on stage since 1905 for $4,000 and headed for Arizona to make their picture. Not impressed with the Arizona scenery they continued on to Hollywood, California.
      DeMille rented a barn on Vine Street, just north of Sunset Boulevard. He began filming The Squaw Man on December 29, 1913. For outdoor filming he was his own location scout and found beautiful settings: San Pedro was the ideal location for the harbor scenes; the San Fernando Valley just the spot for the western saloon; Keen Camp in Idllwild, California perfect for cattle grazing scenes in the open range; and, Mount Palomar for snow scenes.
      The Squaw Man, the first of many Westerns to come, was released on February 15, 1914 to the delight of audiences who flocked to it. Not only was it the first feature length film produced in and around Hollywood but it was the film that would jump-start the amazing directing career of the great Cecil B. DeMille.
      Interesting note that DeMille would remake The Squaw Man twice more! Four years later as a silent and then again in 1931 as an early sound film.

      BLAINE GALE, who was invited to play the score on a keyboard for the recent screening of The Squaw Man on the Brigham Young University campus will provide a score on the Wurlitzer Theatre Pipe Organ for our screening on Thursday & Friday, MARCH 13 & 14th at 7:30 pm

       

      Squaw Man

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

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  3. Mar
    15
    Sat

    1. St. Patrick’s Day Celebration – Dinner and Dance
      7:00 pm – 11:00 pm

      Saint Patty’s Party

      Saturday Night March 15th will be our St Patrick’s Day Celebration! Come and enjoy our Famous “Corned Beef and Cabbage Buffet” along with Baked Chicken Breasts and all the traditional goodies. We have Glen Prisk performing a few “Irish Jigs” on the Mighty Wurlitzer,  so be sure to get your green on and come dance to the sounds of the Egan Brother Trio.


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  4. Mar
    27
    Thu

    1. The Chaplin Mutual Comedies – Part 3 of 4 – Silent Movie
      7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

      The Chaplin Mutual Comedies Part 3 of 4

      The 100th Year of Charlie Chaplin in the movies continues with “Behind the Screen”, “The Rink” & “Easy Street”.

       

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  5. Mar
    28
    Fri

    1. The Chaplin Mutual Comedies – Part 3 of 4 – Silent Movie
      7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

      The Chaplin Mutual Comedies Part 3 of 4

      The 100th Year of Charlie Chaplin in the movies continues with “Behind the Screen”, “The Rink” & “Easy Street”.

       

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  6. Apr
    10
    Thu

    1. Richard Barthelmess “Tolerable David” – Silent Movie
      7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

      Tolerable David

      The stories that fill us with the deepest sense of meaning are invariably those that figure some universal truth. “TOL’ABLE DAVID” draws openly upon the story of David & Goliath, as we see David for the first time studying a picture of the young shepherd confronting the menacing giant. This film draws lovingly on the experience of growing up in a pastoral time of America. It’s a classic!

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  7. Apr
    11
    Fri

    1. Richard Barthelmess “Tolerable David” – Silent Movie
      7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

      Tolerable David

      The stories that fill us with the deepest sense of meaning are invariably those that figure some universal truth. “TOL’ABLE DAVID” draws openly upon the story of David & Goliath, as we see David for the first time studying a picture of the young shepherd confronting the menacing giant. This film draws lovingly on the experience of growing up in a pastoral time of America. It’s a classic!

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  8. Apr
    19
    Sat

    1. Easter Buffet – Dinner and Dance
      7:00 pm – 11:00 pm

      Easter Buffet

      Saturday Night April 19th.  Spring is in the air!  The Easter Bunny is everywhere!  He’s put together a tasty buffet of “Roast Turkey and Baked Ham” to delight one and all.  Mr. David Massey will be on the keyboards playing your traditional Easter Favorites. Then get out and get Hopping to the dance sounds of EBT.

       

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  9. Apr
    24
    Thu

    1. King of Kings – Silent Movie
      7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

      King of Kings

      “One of the most difficult themes, the story Christ’s passion and death, is transferred to the screen with a solemnity and a convincing impressiveness that surpasses “The Ten Commandments” or any other picture of its type ever made.”    –Betty Colfax, Evening Graphic, 1927

      The above quote from a review of DeMille’s “The KING Of KINGS” could still be used today in expounding the merits of this extraordinary film. It held a special place in the directors heart and was the one film he would never remake.

      What radiates from DeMille’s film is the Savior’s love for mankind. In one of the most touching moments ever captured on film, a little girl carrying a doll with a broken leg seeks Jesus for help. His apostles gently try to usher her away until the Savior rebukes them and invites the girl to come to him.

      She holds up her precious doll, and Jesus, with a twinkle in his eyes, ponders a solution. He scratches his forehead quizzically, then, using his carpentry skills, breaks a twig off a nearby tree branch and uses it to repair the doll’s leg.

      The look of joy on that little girl’s face as her doll is restored to completeness conveys Christ’s love for little children better than any words. And that is just one of many precious touches in the film.

      The power of the crucifixion scene is like seeing a Dore print come to life. No film has ever captured this pivotal event of history as well as DeMille’s “The King of Kings”.

      Another brilliant moment in the film has a Roman soldier tearing the mother of the unrepentant thief away from the base of her son’s cross. She staggers blindly to the side of Mary, the mother of Christ, looks up at Christ on the cross, then into the face of Mary–then turns and points, crying out, “That’s my son up there”. Mary embraces the sobbing mother as she too looks upward at her son.

      There is a majesty to watching the life of Christ in powerful images without voice, especially when accompanied by an inspired score, and Blaine Gale will provide that accompaniment with our presentation.

      We hope that you will join with us for this very special Easter presentation.

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  10. Apr
    25
    Fri

    1. King of Kings – Silent Movie
      7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

      King of Kings

      “One of the most difficult themes, the story Christ’s passion and death, is transferred to the screen with a solemnity and a convincing impressiveness that surpasses “The Ten Commandments” or any other picture of its type ever made.”    –Betty Colfax, Evening Graphic, 1927

      The above quote from a review of DeMille’s “The KING Of KINGS” could still be used today in expounding the merits of this extraordinary film. It held a special place in the directors heart and was the one film he would never remake.

      What radiates from DeMille’s film is the Savior’s love for mankind. In one of the most touching moments ever captured on film, a little girl carrying a doll with a broken leg seeks Jesus for help. His apostles gently try to usher her away until the Savior rebukes them and invites the girl to come to him.

      She holds up her precious doll, and Jesus, with a twinkle in his eyes, ponders a solution. He scratches his forehead quizzically, then, using his carpentry skills, breaks a twig off a nearby tree branch and uses it to repair the doll’s leg.

      The look of joy on that little girl’s face as her doll is restored to completeness conveys Christ’s love for little children better than any words. And that is just one of many precious touches in the film.

      The power of the crucifixion scene is like seeing a Dore print come to life. No film has ever captured this pivotal event of history as well as DeMille’s “The King of Kings”.

      Another brilliant moment in the film has a Roman soldier tearing the mother of the unrepentant thief away from the base of her son’s cross. She staggers blindly to the side of Mary, the mother of Christ, looks up at Christ on the cross, then into the face of Mary–then turns and points, crying out, “That’s my son up there”. Mary embraces the sobbing mother as she too looks upward at her son.

      There is a majesty to watching the life of Christ in powerful images without voice, especially when accompanied by an inspired score, and Blaine Gale will provide that accompaniment with our presentation.

      We hope that you will join with us for this very special Easter presentation.

      Share this event with your friends!

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  11. May
    10
    Sat

    1. Mother’s Day Celebration – Dinner and Dance
      7:00 pm – 11:00 pm

      Mother’s Day Celebration

      Saturday Night May 10th!  It’s Mom’s Night Out! So get your mother and wife out of the house and down to our “Mothers Day Celebration”.  She will love our “Roast Beef and Chicken Cordon Bleu Buffet” but the best part is, she won’t have to do the cooking!  Blaine Gale will be serenading mom with her favorite music on the keyboards. Then she will be dancing to the music of EBT.

       

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  12. May
    15
    Thu

    1. The Passion of Joan of Arc – Silent Movie
      7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

      The Passion of Joan of Arc

      On May 15 & 16th, one of the screen’s true masterpieces featuring French actress Falconetti as Joan of Arc in one of the greatest performances of all time under the masterful direction of Carl Theodor Dreyer.

      “I wanted to interpret a hymn to the triumph of the soul over life. In Falconetti, who plays Joan, I found what I might, with very bold expression, allow myself to call “the martyr’s reincarnation.” –Dreyer

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  13. May
    16
    Fri

    1. The Passion of Joan of Arc – Silent Movie
      7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

      The Passion of Joan of Arc

      On May 15 & 16th, one of the screen’s true masterpieces featuring French actress Falconetti as Joan of Arc in one of the greatest performances of all time under the masterful direction of Carl Theodor Dreyer.

      “I wanted to interpret a hymn to the triumph of the soul over life. In Falconetti, who plays Joan, I found what I might, with very bold expression, allow myself to call “the martyr’s reincarnation.” –Dreyer

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  14. May
    29
    Thu

    1. The Chaplin Mutual Comedies – Part 4 of 4 – Silent Movie
      7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

      The Chaplin Mutual Comedies – Part 4 of 4

      Charlie Chaplin’s final three Mutual Classics “The Immigrant” “The Cure” & “The Adventurer”.

       

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  15. May
    30
    Fri

    1. The Chaplin Mutual Comedies – Part 4 of 4 – Silent Movie
      7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

      The Chaplin Mutual Comedies – Part 4 of 4

      Charlie Chaplin’s final three Mutual Classics “The Immigrant” “The Cure” & “The Adventurer”.

       

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